Manali




To begin with, I would like to take the chance to give you folks knowledge on this wonderful Hillstation Manali. Manali is a high-height Himalayan resort town in India’s northern Himachal Pradesh state.


It has a notoriety for being a hiking focus and special first night goal. Set on the Beas River, it’s an entryway for skiing in the Solang Valley and trekking in Parvati Valley. It’s likewise a bouncing off point for paragliding, boating and mountaineering in the Pir Panjal mountains, home to 4,000m-high Rohtang Pass.

A valley situated in the Kullu region of Himachal Pradesh, Manali overpowers its guests by blooming apple trees and courageous snow secured streets.

Encompassed by great slopes and woody woodlands, the interesting appeal of Manali has caught the world’s consideration and has turned out to be a standout amongst the most went by traveller goals in India. The immaculate River Beas streams directly through the town, making an entrancing and enchanting scene. Settled toward one side of the Kullu Valley, Manali is a well-known slope station with attractions, for example, the Rohtang Pass and Solang Valley close-by.

Rohtang Pass is secured with snow consistently and is a decent involvement in itself. This is the perfect place for voyagers hoping to loosen up and restore in the lap of nature, for there is no place in the nation more dynamic and beguiling as Manali.

This town additionally has a large number of choices for travellers searching for bold exercises like trekking, paragliding, skiing, zorbing, wilderness boating and so on. Other than courageous exercises, Manali additionally has a considerable measure of sanctuaries which all voyagers and lovers love to visit including the Raghunath sanctuary and Jagannathi Devi Temple is one of the essential ones.

Hadimba Temple, a fourteenth-century sanctuary is celebrated for its wooden design and for its religious esteem. Manali is additionally utilized as the base town for the Manali-Leh expressway and Leh is around 479 km from here. Lahaul and Spiti area can likewise be gotten to from here amid the summers utilizing a similar thruway.

All roads from this place lead to heaven. when I say its heaven Starting point for drives to Spiti valley and Ladakh. Very beautiful. Snows through most of January and February. Can be visited throughout the year. Can be crowded during peak seasons and the only drawback is that this location is accessible by road only.

So guys keep travelling and keep exploring. Cheers!!!

St. John In The Wilderness

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After visiting the Atari-Wagha border daily ceremonial parade, we (Tanveer and me) resumed our journey to Dharamshala. When you move and go around  these places, you never feel that you are away from home.

As I just love street food, I was craving to have a lot  and my dear friend said,  let’s go tiger and we had all kinds of paratha by visiting  a different dhaba (a highway restaurant, serving authentic regional dishes at throwaway prices) and enjoyed  Patiala peg of lassi.

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After a long journey, we reached a wonderful place in the woods and that  was a church folks, standing alone in the wilderness St. John, since 1852  made up  of black stone.

The story of this church is very interesting. This church survived an earthquake in 1905. This very earthquake killed somewhere close to 20000  people and destroying many historic buildings in and around Dharamshala and Kangra area.

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Thankfully St John’s suffered marginally losing only the bell tower and its spire.

St. John in the wilderness church was built for John the Baptist, Located 1.2 km from the main Mcleodganj. It is located  in a very dense forest and the way to the church is very cold and foggy.

If you love walking, this will be a heavenly experience for you! In  the church, there is  an information board which tells the story and  it’s been recently  installed.

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This Church was the main  center of attraction during  the pre-independence era. This was very powerful in the northern region. St. John the wilderness is built using  neo-Gothic architecture, the church is known for its Belgian stained-glass windows donated by Lady Elgin (Mary Louisa Lambton), wife of Lord Elgin.

There is a bell which was cast in 1915 by Mears and Stain bank of England.

Most of the time here in the Church, I spent looking around and taking a  glimpse of the structure. There is a grave there,  lot actually a lot, but a grave caught my attention.

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This was the grave of Lord Elgin or you can say James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin. He was the Viceroy of India (1862–1863) the Governor General of India, apart from Governor General of the Province of Canada and High Commissioner in charge of opening trades with China and Japan.

He became Viceroy of India in 1862, and was the first to use Peterhoff, Shimla as the official residence of the Viceroy. He died in 1863 of a heart attack while crossing a swinging rope and wood bridge over the river Chadly, on the lap between Kullu and Lahul.

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Lord Elgin was so attached with the Deodar grove that surrounded the church that he wished he would rest in peace if he was buried here in the church premises. The place reminded him of Scotland. According to his wish, he was buried in the premises of the St. John’s Church in Dharamshala.

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In the same premises is also the grave of the Lieutenant General of Punjab David Mcleod after whom the place Mcleodganj is named.

It looks like a hidden treasure and it has that element to turn you into a tireless traveller. You just can’t ignore the urge to visit it once that you have heard of it. In my opinion, you should give it a try and visit this beautiful  piece of history, the Church of St John in the Wilderness morphs as a camouflage into the natural surroundings of the Himachal deodar forest. Surviving 150 years of varied weather, intense earthquakes and yet standing tall,  this structure deserves one visit for sure!

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Thanks guys for reading the post! Cheers!!!

I will return soon with another fascinating account of another place of historical importance!

Kangra Fort-Oldest Fort in Himalayan Region



The Kangra Fort was built by the royal Rajput family of Kangra (the Katoch dynasty), which traces its origins to the ancient Trigarta Kingdom, mentioned in the Mahabharata epic. It is the largest fort in the Himalayas and probably the oldest dated fort in India.

The entrance to the fort is through a small courtyard enclosed between two gates which were built during the Sikh period, as appears from an inscription over the entrance. From here a long and narrow passage leads up to the top of the fort, through the Ahani and Amiri Darwaza (gate), both attributed to Nawab Saif Ali Khan, the first Mughal Governor of Kangra. About 500 feet from the outer gate the passage turns round at a very sharp angle and passes through the Jehangiri Darwaza.

The Darsani Darwaza, which is now flanked by defaced statues of River Goddesses Ganga and Yamuna gave access to a courtyard, along the south side of which stood the shrines Lakshmi-Narayana Sitala and Ambika Devi. In between these shrines is a passage that leads up to the palace. It is one of the most beautiful forts in India.

“It is said that Kangra belongs to one who owns the fort.”

There you find audio guide i must say that is very helpful and give you the details of the fort. They charge 100 per device so must see fort through the audio guide and you loved this place.