Rang Ghar (Rong Ghor)

North-East bestows  beautiful landscapes and is historically important for the Ahom Dynasty.  I am back again with one of  the monument from the present Assam state.

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The rong ghor in Assamese language is located in the Shiv Sagar district of Assam. Rang Ghar is a two-story structure which once served as the royal sports-pavilion where Ahom kings and nobles were spectators of  games such as  buffalo fights and other sports at Rupahi Pathar particularly during the Rongali Bihu festival in the Ahom capital of Rangpur.

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Before understanding the historic importance of this building,  let me take you  down deep in the history of Ahom Dynasty! This structure was built by Pramatta Singha in AD 1744-1750. It is  said to be one of the oldest surviving amphitheaters in Asia, the building was constructed during the reign of Swargadeo.

The Ahom dynasty (1228–1826) ruled the Ahom Kingdom in present-day Assam for nearly 600 years. The dynasty was established by Sukaphaa, a Shan prince of Mong Mao who came to Assam after crossing the Patkai  Mountains.

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The rule of this dynasty ended with the Burmese invasion of Assam and the subsequent annexation by the British East India Company following the Treaty of Yandabo in 1826.

In medieval chronicles, the kings of this dynasty were called Asam Raja, whereas the subjects of the kingdom called them Chaopha (Chao-ruler, Pha-heaven), or as Swargadeo (the equivalent in Assamese) from the 16th century. You can visit my other post Majuli River Islandfor little more information about the religious practices of  Ahom  Dynasty.

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It is 3 km away from the center of the Sivasagar Town &  situated by the side of the Assam Trunk Road; it lies  northeast of the Rangpur Palace, a seven-storied royal complex comprising the Talatal Ghar and the Kareng Ghar.

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This structure is beautifully preserved by the  ASI (Archaeological Survey Of India) and have very eye pleasing green grasses and lots of flowers in the compound. The roof of the Rang Ghar is shaped like an inverted royal Ahom long boat. The base of the monument has a series of arched entrances, while  the roof atop sits a decorative pair of carved stone crocodiles.

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It is not a very big building but you can have a glance of Ahome dynasty in it!

Stay connected for many more interesting historical  & religious places’ posts! Cheers!!!

Dawki: Friendly International Border & A Hidden Paradise


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While recently travelling through scenic Meghalaya., We had our own cab, reaching that place and the driver Mr. Sailendra Rai originally from Bihar took us to the place. Dawki is located in the Jaintia Hills district, Meghalaya. The Dawki-Tamabil border crossing between India and Bangladesh is now used to ferry across both passenger and cargo. In fact, the new Guwahati-Shillong-Dhaka bus service that was flagged off by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bangladeshi counterpart Sheikh Hasina last year uses this route.
Add to this the scenic drive to Dawki and the trip is certainly worth the effort. Dawki-Tamabil is one of the few road border crossings between India and Bangladesh. It is used mainly for coal transportation to Bangladesh.

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The relaxed atmosphere at the Dawki border – which also has the magnificent Umngot River runs from the Indian side to the Bangladeshi side – made me wonder about undocumented, illegal migration. Dawki Bridge is a suspension bridge over the Umngot River. It was constructed in 1932 by the British. I couldn’t help but think how easy it would be to cross this border. and illegal migration from Bangladesh is certainly a big issue for India’s the Northeastern Border States.

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On the border when we reached there, we found a very less security from our side and from the Bangladeshi side as well. There is a Sub Major who told us go Beta visit the border you are here to see is-init go on. There you see the stone marked 1275, it is in India just wander around and in any point don’t cross that stone.

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There we had a chance of meeting another BSF Jawan from Delhi; he was on duty by the thoroughfare. He was in his mode frustrated by the visitors and Young Couples tries to take a selfie by the Bangladesh Side by crossing the Indian Border. He told us, though the border is friendly we should always keep our check once you crossed the Stone, you are officially illegal immigrants and We (Indian) and they (Bangladeshi) Commando have the power to arrest you.

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All of this made me happy. Such connectivity is also important for the development of the Northeast, which should become India’s gateway to Southeast Asia. En route back to Shillong, we saw the Dawaki Bridge. You just fall in love with this place and the water in the Umngot river is crystal clear but make you mind before visiting Dawaki that we are not going to be alone in this place.

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In my opinion, let the friendly borders between India and Bangladesh continue, step up efforts to crack down on cross-border criminal gangs, develop the region’s economy, and liberalize the visa regime. Such an approach will not only help tackle illegal migration from Bangladesh but also greater commerce between the two countries. So that these neighbouring country able to enjoy a much greater relationship in trade, culture, tradition and many more. At the end both sides of the people are same. 🙂